Monday, May 30, 2011

Amorphophallus titanum (carrion flower) and Classification

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Amorphophallus titanum

Amorphophallus titanum is a plant of the tribe-talasan taro (Araceae) endemic of Sumatra, Indonesia, known as a plant with flowers (plural) in the world, though the record mentions that a relative, A. gigas (also endemic of Sumatra) to earn interest as high as 5mIts name comes from the flowers that smell like a rotting carcass, actually intended to invite the beetle and fly pollinators for flowersMany people often mistake and could not distinguish the dead flowers with "Rafflesia arnoldii" probably because people already know that as the largest flower Rafflesia and then become biased by the size of dead flowers are also great.

This plant has two phases in his life that appeared alternately, phase of vegetative and generative phase. In the vegetative phase of leaf and stem quasi appearHeight can reach 6m. After some time (years), it wilted vegetative organs and dormant tubersIf the reserve is adequate food in tubers and supportive environment, majemuknya flowers will appear. If less food reserves to grow back their leaves.
Amorphophallus titanum


The flowers are very large and high, shaped like a phallus (actually a cob or spadix) surrounded by a sheath of interest which is also large. The flowers married one and protogini: female flowers receptive first, then followed by cooking the male flowers, as a mechanism to prevent self pollination.

Classification of Amorphophallus titanum

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
Order: Alismatales
Family: Araceae
Subfamily: Aroideae
Tribe: Thomsonieae
Genus: Amorphophallus
Species: A. titanum
Dead flowers are now scattered in various places throughout the world, mainly owned by the botanical garden or a breeder-breeder specialistIn America, the flower that appears often given the nickname or given name and always attracted many visitorsUniquely many visitors come to "enjoy the smell of"her.  
Amorphophallus titanum (carrion flower) and Classification

Rafflesia arnoldii and Classification

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Rafflesia arnoldii is a obligate parasites of plants known for having very large flowers, even the largest flower in the worldit grew up in the network vines (lianas) Tetrastigma and has no leaves and is unable to photosynthesize. This plant endemic to Indonesia: Sumatra island, especially the southern part (Bengkulu, Jambi and South Sumatra)Kerinci Seblat National Park is the main conservation area of this speciesThis species, together with the other members of the genus Rafflesia, threatened status due to massive deforestation. In Java patma grow only one type of parasite, Rafflesia patma.

Rafflesia arnoldii is rare and fairly hard to locate. It is especially difficult to locate the flower in forests as the buds take many months to develop and the flower lasts for just a few days. The flowers are unisexual and thus proximity of male and female flowers is vital for successful pollination. These factors make successful pollination a rare event.
 
When Rafflesia is ready to reproduce, a tiny bud forms on the outside of the root or stem and develops over a period of a year. The cabbage like head that develops, eventually opens to reveal the flower. The stigma or stamen are attached to a spiked disk inside the flower. A foul smell of rotting meat attracts flies and beetles to pollinate. To pollinate successfully, the flies and/or beetles must visit both the male and female plants. The fruit produced are round lots filled with smooth flesh including many thousands of hard coated seeds that are eaten and spread by tree shrews .

Classification of  Rafflesia arnoldii

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Angiosperms
Class: Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Malpighiales
Family: Rafflesiaceae
Genus: Rafflesia
Species: R. arnoldii
Rafflesia arnoldii and Classification

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Adansonia digitata (African Baobab)

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This tree is a native plant of Madagascar, Africa and AustraliaThese trees can adapt to extreme temperatures that reached 40 ° C. A typical common name is baobab. Other common names include boab, boaboa, bottle tree, upside-down tree, and monkey bread tree. The generic name honours Michel Adanson, the French naturalist and explorer who described A. digitata., This tree was indeed to save up to 300 liters of water! so they can grow up to 500 years.

Adansonia is a genus of eight species of tree, Adansonias reach heights of 5 to 30 metres (16 to 98 ft) and have trunk diameters of 7 to 11 metres (23 to 36 ft). Glencoe Baobab - an African Baobab specimen in Limpopo Province, South Africa, often considered the largest example alive, up to recent times had a circumference of 47 metres (154 ft).
Adansonia digitata
Adansonia grandidieri

Classification of Adansonia (Baobab)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Subfamily: Bombacoideae
Genus: Adansonia


Adansonia digitata (African Baobab)

Nepenthes L and Classification (marsupial plant)

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The Nepenthes a carnivorous plant (insect eaters) who mostly found in forest areas in Asia, popularly known as tropical pitcher plants or monkey cups, are a genus of carnivorous plants in the monotypic family Nepenthaceae. They are mostly liana-forming plants of the Old World tropics, ranging from South China, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines; westward to Madagascar and the Seychelles ; southward to Australia and New Caledonia; and northward to India and Sri Lanka . The greatest diversity occurs on Borneo and Sumatra with many endemic species.  Approximately 82 species in the world, 64 species live in Indonesiabut now 32 species recorded live hidup.berikut one of them:

Nepenthes Bicalcarata  
Nepenthes aristolochioides
Nepenthes jacquelineae
Nepenthes Rafflesiana
Nepenthes northiana
Classification of Nepenthes
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Nepenthaceae

Genus: Nepenthes
L.

Part of Naphentes

The most obvious interaction between Nepenthes species and its environment, including other organisms, is that of predator and prey. Nepenthes species certainly attract and kill their prey, albeit passively, through active production of attractive colours, sugary nectar, and even sweet scents. From this relationship, the plants primarily gain nitrogen and phosphorus to supplement their nutrient requirements for growth, given that soil nutrients are typically lacking. The most frequent prey is an abundant and diverse group of arthropods, with ants and other insects topping the menu. Other arthropods that are found frequently include spiders, scorpions, and centipedes, while snails and frogs are more unusual but not unheard of. The most uncommon prey for Nepenthes species includes rats found in N. rajah. The composition of prey captured depends on many factors, including location, but can incorporate hundreds of individual insects and many different species. While many Nepenthes are generalists in what they capture, at least one, N. albomarginata, has specialised and almost exclusively traps termites and produces nearly no nectar. Nepenthes albomarginata gains its name from the ring of white trichomes that are directly beneath the peristome. These trichomes—or "hairs"—are palatable to termites and will attract them to the pitcher. In the course of collecting the edible trichomes, hundreds or thousands of termites will fall into the pitcher.


Habitat: forest peat and heath forest at an altitude of 0-1200m above sea level.
characteristics:
trunk: <15m, diammeter <10mm, cylindrical shape
leaves: thick-stemmed, length <20cm, width <5cm


Nepenthes L and Classification (marsupial plant)

Friday, May 27, 2011

Venus and Classification (plant-eating insects)

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Dionaea muscipula

There are also several types of plants that "eat" in a way admirableOne is the "Venus", plants that capture and eat insects that perchMaybe it could be said of the carnivorous plantsDionaea muscipula or called Venus flytraps are the most popular. 

A lot of cartoons and comic illustration describes malignancy that resembles plant this cropPlants that are endemic in the regions of North and South Carolina have leaves modified into a similar trap with a hair barrette motion sensor in itInsects that are trapped will be clamped tightly and began to be digested with enzymes that release

These plants get the prey in the following manner:
flies feeding suddenly find plants that are very compelling: Venus plantThe form of this plant resemble a pair of hands holding a bowlWhich makes it interesting, besides the red color, these plants also issued a fragrant smell that comes from the glands around the eyelidFlies are attracted by the smell fragrant and landed on the petals without hesitation.  When moving to find foodaccidentally touching the feathers fly petals that seem harmlessA few moments later, the eyelids close quickly. Flies strong sandwiched between two such lidsPlants Venus began to remove fluid that "dissolves the flesh" to form a fly turned into a kind of gel. Gel is then absorbed by plants.

Classification of  Venus flytraps
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Droseraceae
Genus: Dionaea
Species: D. muscipula
 
Venus and Classification (plant-eating insects)
 

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